The Cult of the Souls

They say that alcohol makes you become more of who you are. It loosens inhibitions, it gives you the “liquid courage” to act out as you will. Many people describe a “bad drunk” or “good drunk” as traits people have, and others say as long as you drink moderately you will always be a good drunk. But for the great god Dionysus… both are true.

 

Dionysus is a god of madness, perpetually on the verge between two very different personalities. Dionysus, the Greek god of wine and grapes, is shown to be a beautiful wildly attractive god. Often depicted having the horns of the bull on his head (which would later in the Medieval Dark Ages, Dionsysus’s imagery would be transferred to a demonic being, hence why the Devil has horns), Dionysus was a mercurial being.

 

There would be times when this grape god would be sweet, and he would emit an aura of complete relaxation around all those who encountered him. Then there were other times when his second personality would come down upon those near him. This second persona was full of bitterness, full of an untempered fury that could not be halted no matter what someone did. These two personas rage in this divine being equally.

 

In the world of art, it has often been noted that Western art always bears the conflict of duality, while Eastern art often shows more often a harmony or union of beings rather than duality. This duality in Western art is sometimes called the Apollo and Dionysus conflict.

 

It can be seen in almost any story. The hero is typically the Apollonian hero, someone who stands up for justice and order, while the Dionysus character is usually the villain of the story. The villain of course wants to see order put asunder, and chaos to reign.

 

This is not always the case. Sometimes the Dionysus character is the hero versus an Apollonian villain. In almost every case though, there seems to be an encroaching of chaos at the very seams of everything. As if the drunk, ladaiscal god of Dionysus is always teetering on the edge to consume everything, gulping down the great wine of life itself.

 

This encroaching chaos is something that holds true in most Western art. It probably derives much of its roots from the fact that European cultures were often bathed in wars between various nations. Whereas Asian culture often had wars as well, but typically it was within the same country of competing dynasties.

 

However it formed, it is intriguing to study the personalities of Dionysus who had once can be the most grateful being on the planet and within the same breath turn himself into a lion that eats everyone on board of a ship.

 

When you think about it, it truly makes sense why Dionysus would be the god of drunken revelry. Along with the grapes and wine, Dionysus other symbols are the bull (hence the horns often depicted on his head), serpent, tiger and ivy.

 

Even his symbols conflict with each other. Dionysus was often symbolized with the vine known for producing wine, as well as the toxic ivy plant that was barren of any kind of wine producing abilities.

 

The very nature of duality is integral to Dionysus’s mercurial, and often dangerous nature.

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Duality of the Divine Drinker

They say that alcohol makes you become more of who you are. It loosens inhibitions, it gives you the “liquid courage” to act out as you will. Many people describe a “bad drunk” or “good drunk” as traits people have, and others say as long as you drink moderately you will always be a good drunk. But for the great god Dionysus… both are true.

 

Dionysus is a god of madness, perpetually on the verge between two very different personalities. Dionysus, the Greek god of wine and grapes, is shown to be a beautiful wildly attractive god. Often depicted having the horns of the bull on his head (which would later in the Medieval Dark Ages, Dionsysus’s imagery would be transferred to a demonic being, hence why the Devil has horns), Dionysus was a mercurial being.

 

There would be times when this grape god would be sweet, and he would emit an aura of complete relaxation around all those who encountered him. Then there were other times when his second personality would come down upon those near him. This second persona was full of bitterness, full of an untempered fury that could not be halted no matter what someone did. These two personas rage in this divine being equally.

 

In the world of art, it has often been noted that Western art always bears the conflict of duality, while Eastern art often shows more often a harmony or union of beings rather than duality. This duality in Western art is sometimes called the Apollo and Dionysus conflict.

 

It can be seen in almost any story. The hero is typically the Apollonian hero, someone who stands up for justice and order, while the Dionysus character is usually the villain of the story. The villain of course wants to see order put asunder, and chaos to reign.

 

This is not always the case. Sometimes the Dionysus character is the hero versus an Apollonian villain. In almost every case though, there seems to be an encroaching of chaos at the very seams of everything. As if the drunk, ladaiscal god of Dionysus is always teetering on the edge to consume everything, gulping down the great wine of life itself.

 

This encroaching chaos is something that holds true in most Western art. It probably derives much of its roots from the fact that European cultures were often bathed in wars between various nations. Whereas Asian culture often had wars as well, but typically it was within the same country of competing dynasties.

 

However it formed, it is intriguing to study the personalities of Dionysus who had once can be the most grateful being on the planet and within the same breath turn himself into a lion that eats everyone on board of a ship.

 

When you think about it, it truly makes sense why Dionysus would be the god of drunken revelry. Along with the grapes and wine, Dionysus other symbols are the bull (hence the horns often depicted on his head), serpent, tiger and ivy.

 

Even his symbols conflict with each other. Dionysus was often symbolized with the vine known for producing wine, as well as the toxic ivy plant that was barren of any kind of wine producing abilities.

 

The very nature of duality is integral to Dionysus’s mercurial, and often dangerous nature.

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Strange Parallels between Jesus and the Drunk God

Dionysus is an intriguing Greek god from the ancient world. One that still to this very day, is time honored and revered in all sorts of art and mediums. He appears in TV shows, movies, books both fiction and philosophical, and permeates throughout our entire culture.

 

Even when Dionysus is not present, there is often talk in art about other works of the ensuing Western conflict that appears in almost all Western art – the conflict of order and chaos. Apollo is often represented as order in art. While Dionysus is the chaos, as is befitting the god of ritual madness.

 

How did Dionysus come to be though? How did this strange, drunk god of revelry come to be born in our world?

 

The myth of Dionysus tells a tale of an affair. Zeus, the god of gods, had a relationship with a mortal woman named Semele. During their time together, Semele became impregnated by Zeus, a baby began to grow in her and her fate became tied with the gods themselves. Hera, the wife of Zeus, in her jealousy disguised herself as an old crone. Or in some other tales Hera comes to Semele as a nurse during Semele’s pregnancy.

 

Herea breeds doubt into Semele that Zeus was indeed the father. Because Hera knows what is to come in the poor fate that Semele finds herself trotting willfully into. In desperation for proof, Semele begs of Zeus to come and show his godhood to them, to prove that he is indeed the god of gods up on high. Zeus begs her not to ask this of him, but in her doubt, Semele will not relent.

 

Zeus eventually caves to Semele’s pleading and comes down from the heavens wreathed in bolts of lighting and clouds of thunder. Semele is given verified proof that Zeus is indeed the father of her unborn child. However, as Hera had likely planned it, no mortal can witness an undisguised god without dying. Semele is killed by witnessing Zeus descend, and her baby begins to die inside of her.

 

Zeus opens up the womb of Semele and cuts open his thigh. When he does this, he places the unborn baby into his thigh and sews up the wound. There, the baby is given the nutrients of the king of gods and its life is saved.

 

Eventually this baby will be born once it is full grown, and that baby’s name is Dionysus. Because of these strange events around his birthing, Dionysus is also known as the twice born god – born once from mortals and once from the gods.

 

This traumatic experience could explain quite bit about Dionysus feverish nature, and perhaps explain some of his insanity as well. In other stories, Dionysus is born of Demeter and Zeus. Simialrly, a jealous Hera comes to kill Dionysus. Hera summons Titans to rip the baby to pieces.

 

In this alternative, Zeus comes to the rescue and turns the titans to dust with his lightning bolts. However, he is too late. Dionsysus has been killed. Zeus takes Dionysus’s heart and embeds into his thigh to regrow the dead god child. In this way, Dionysus is still the twice born god.

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The God Hera Hated

Dionysus is an intriguing Greek god from the ancient world. One that still to this very day, is time honored and revered in all sorts of art and mediums. He appears in TV shows, movies, books both fiction and philosophical, and permeates throughout our entire culture.

 

Even when Dionysus is not present, there is often talk in art about other works of the ensuing Western conflict that appears in almost all Western art – the conflict of order and chaos. Apollo is often represented as order in art. While Dionysus is the chaos, as is befitting the god of ritual madness.

 

How did Dionysus come to be though? How did this strange, drunk god of revelry come to be born in our world?

 

The myth of Dionysus tells a tale of an affair. Zeus, the god of gods, had a relationship with a mortal woman named Semele. During their time together, Semele became impregnated by Zeus, a baby began to grow in her and her fate became tied with the gods themselves. Hera, the wife of Zeus, in her jealousy disguised herself as an old crone. Or in some other tales Hera comes to Semele as a nurse during Semele’s pregnancy.

 

Herea breeds doubt into Semele that Zeus was indeed the father. Because Hera knows what is to come in the poor fate that Semele finds herself trotting willfully into. In desperation for proof, Semele begs of Zeus to come and show his godhood to them, to prove that he is indeed the god of gods up on high. Zeus begs her not to ask this of him, but in her doubt, Semele will not relent.

 

Zeus eventually caves to Semele’s pleading and comes down from the heavens wreathed in bolts of lighting and clouds of thunder. Semele is given verified proof that Zeus is indeed the father of her unborn child. However, as Hera had likely planned it, no mortal can witness an undisguised god without dying. Semele is killed by witnessing Zeus descend, and her baby begins to die inside of her.

 

Zeus opens up the womb of Semele and cuts open his thigh. When he does this, he places the unborn baby into his thigh and sews up the wound. There, the baby is given the nutrients of the king of gods and its life is saved.

 

Eventually this baby will be born once it is full grown, and that baby’s name is Dionysus. Because of these strange events around his birthing, Dionysus is also known as the twice born god – born once from mortals and once from the gods.

 

This traumatic experience could explain quite bit about Dionysus feverish nature, and perhaps explain some of his insanity as well. In other stories, Dionysus is born of Demeter and Zeus. Simialrly, a jealous Hera comes to kill Dionysus. Hera summons Titans to rip the baby to pieces.

 

In this alternative, Zeus comes to the rescue and turns the titans to dust with his lightning bolts. However, he is too late. Dionsysus has been killed. Zeus takes Dionysus’s heart and embeds into his thigh to regrow the dead god child. In this way, Dionysus is still the twice born god.

Thanks to this massage therapy company in Ogden for their support.

Twice Born God of Wine

Dionysus is an intriguing Greek god from the ancient world. One that still to this very day, is time honored and revered in all sorts of art and mediums. He appears in TV shows, movies, books both fiction and philosophical, and permeates throughout our entire culture.

 

Even when Dionysus is not present, there is often talk in art about other works of the ensuing Western conflict that appears in almost all Western art – the conflict of order and chaos. Apollo is often represented as order in art. While Dionysus is the chaos, as is befitting the god of ritual madness.

 

How did Dionysus come to be though? How did this strange, drunk god of revelry come to be born in our world?

 

The myth of Dionysus tells a tale of an affair. Zeus, the god of gods, had a relationship with a mortal woman named Semele. During their time together, Semele became impregnated by Zeus, a baby began to grow in her and her fate became tied with the gods themselves. Hera, the wife of Zeus, in her jealousy disguised herself as an old crone. Or in some other tales Hera comes to Semele as a nurse during Semele’s pregnancy.

 

Herea breeds doubt into Semele that Zeus was indeed the father. Because Hera knows what is to come in the poor fate that Semele finds herself trotting willfully into. In desperation for proof, Semele begs of Zeus to come and show his godhood to them, to prove that he is indeed the god of gods up on high. Zeus begs her not to ask this of him, but in her doubt, Semele will not relent.

 

Zeus eventually caves to Semele’s pleading and comes down from the heavens wreathed in bolts of lighting and clouds of thunder. Semele is given verified proof that Zeus is indeed the father of her unborn child. However, as Hera had likely planned it, no mortal can witness an undisguised god without dying. Semele is killed by witnessing Zeus descend, and her baby begins to die inside of her.

 

Zeus opens up the womb of Semele and cuts open his thigh. When he does this, he places the unborn baby into his thigh and sews up the wound. There, the baby is given the nutrients of the king of gods and its life is saved.

 

Eventually this baby will be born once it is full grown, and that baby’s name is Dionysus. Because of these strange events around his birthing, Dionysus is also known as the twice born god – born once from mortals and once from the gods.

 

This traumatic experience could explain quite bit about Dionysus feverish nature, and perhaps explain some of his insanity as well. In other stories, Dionysus is born of Demeter and Zeus. Simialrly, a jealous Hera comes to kill Dionysus. Hera summons Titans to rip the baby to pieces.

 

In this alternative, Zeus comes to the rescue and turns the titans to dust with his lightning bolts. However, he is too late. Dionsysus has been killed. Zeus takes Dionysus’s heart and embeds into his thigh to regrow the dead god child. In this way, Dionysus is still the twice born god.

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